5 Phases for a Successful ICD-10 Transition

22013 ICD-10 Small Coach Final LogoICD-10 is the LAW, and it’s not going away.  In August 2012, HHS announced a final rule moving the ICD-10 compliance date to October 1, 2014. This means that health plans, health care providers, and health care clearinghouses that transact standard health care transactions must use ICD- 10-CM diagnosis codes for services occurring on or after October 1, 2014.

The suggested timeline for a successful ICD-10 transition from start to finish is 18 months, meaning the time to begin preparing is NOW.  What’s required is a sane, measured, and phased approach involving the following five phases: education & awareness, impact assessment, transition plan development, plan implementation, and implementation review.

Phase 1: Engaging and educating Physicians and Staff

Education begins with informing the physicians and staff of the regulatory requirements and deadlines for ICD-10, including the differences between ICD-9 & ICD-10.  Physicians and staff should know how to use the GEMS mapping system, and what documentation changes need to occur to comply with increased code specificity.  Additionally, the benefits and opportunities of ICD-10 CM should be understood.

Phase 2: Assessing Current Readiness and Impact

ICD-10 will touch all aspects of a practice, so understanding current readiness is paramount to a successful implementation.  Health care providers should begin to ask themselves how this new coding system will affect documentation and reporting, as well as the influence it will have on office processes. Physician practices will need to examine the significance of this transition on referrals, payers, and business partners. Budget and productivity will be affected, but to what degree? A detailed impact analysis assessment will determine how claims and electronic transactions will be affected by ICD-10 as well as the impact it will have on PM and EMR software.

Phase 3: Creating a Timeline and Transition Plan

The creation of a timeline and transition plan will support in guiding a practice through the various moving parts of a successful ICD-10 implementation. Create an ICD-10 transition project team with role specific tasks, deadlines, and accountability. Determine area-specific resource needs (human, technological and monetary), including a proposed budget.

Phase 4: Implementing your Transition Plan

Project Managers should plan for productivity loss before, during and after training. Learning and implementing new processes takes time and resources away from day to day duties.  Set a date to begin the transition plan urgently. Coding professionals recommend beginning training on the actual codes 6 – 12 months prior to Oct. 1, 2014. Remember Phase 1-3 need to be accomplished prior to this phase so the time to begin is NOW.

Phase 5: Post Transition Analysis and Reporting

At this point, one can only speculate the requirements of the post transition phase, but monitoring key metrics will be invaluable in determining the results versus desired outcomes of the transition plan. Key metrics include revenue by payer, claims denials, and provider productivity. Monitoring and reporting key metrics will determine if course correction is needed.

With October 1, 2014 rapidly approaching, it is important that every physician practice and healthcare provider in America begin to take urgent action in completing the 5 phases for a successful ICD-10 transition.

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ICD-10 Coach provides education, training, and software to hospital systems, physician practices, and health care providers. ICD-10 Coach is strategically partnered with over fifteen state and national medical associations and societies, and its software developer is an AdminiServe partner with MGMA-ACMPE. For more information on ICD-10 Coach, please call (650) 242-5442 or visit www.icd10coach.com.

Building Strong Super Users

Experience has shown that forming a solid team of “super users” – those team members who will be your front-line support teams – is critically important for a successful transition to a new or replacement electronic health record (EHR).  All too often, little care or direction are given to selecting and developing these critical contributors to both your initial implementation and to ongoing adoption and optimization.

Recent experience with a large health system in San Francisco demonstrates this. The lead of their EHR training team requested senior leadership commitment to a robust super user program.  The result –  these key members of the team were instrumental to a very smooth, successful go-live.

What are the ingredients to making super users truly super?

  • Clear job descriptions – Would you hire someone without first identifying the key responsibilities?  Of course not.  Before you identify who your super users will be (either internal or external), create a clear job description that includes estimated hours required for: their own training, super users support of training, go-live support hours, and ongoing support of your EHR.
  • Skills and Abilities – After drafting an accurate job description, be sure to use that to select the right super users, based on their skills – not on who might be your favorite on the team.  Conversely, don’t select a poor performer, just to get them out of the way.  It is also important to make certain that they can comfortably approach all types of users, especially health professionals, and that they are skilled listeners that don’t react to user frustrations or concerns.
  • “Art” Classes – No, we’re not going to teach our super users how to paint; the first class a new super user should participate in should be The Art of Being a Super User.  This class addresses the “soft skills” needed to be successful in this support and training role: What is a super user?  How do adults learn?  What if I’m providing support and I don’t know the answer?  How do I handle a frustrated provider?  It’s critical that new super users understand adult learning methodologies before you start to train them on your EHR.
  • A Committed Journey– To completely understand both your new EHR system and their role in training and support, your super users should be “out-of-the-count” (not splitting duties) and have a clear, committed path:
    • Art of Being a Super User
    • Super User EHR training
    • Supporting at least two full rounds of classroom training for their co-workers.
    • Pre-go-live 1:1 support and training to further prepare their teams for implementation.
    • Implementation support.
    • Ongoing training, system testing, new-hire support, etc.

And, don’t forget to keep the super user team intact – they will be also be important to assist the staff with refining best practices, learning new features and functions, and invaluable when you are implementing a future upgrade.  Recognizing this key role and empowering your super users to be effective will pay off significantly not just for go-live, but far beyond your initial implementation.

About the Authors

Dr. Greg Forzley

Dr. Greg Forzley (forzleyg@trinity-health.org) is the Chief Medical Information Officer – Health Networks, Trinity Health, and serves as Chairman of the Michigan State Medical Society. Dr. Forzley has been instrumental in improving physician adoption of EMR systems and is a champion of improving patient care through meaningful use concepts.

Tony Onorad

Mr. Tony Onorad (TonyOnorad@OnoradSolutions.com) is the founder of OnoradSolutions, a knowledge improvement consulting firm, and has been an innovator in the adult learning field for over fifteen years. He has led several complex training projects for a variety of clients.

Soft Skills for Hard Results: Training EHR Trainers to…Train!

A casual observation of many EHR trainers reveals an unsettling truth: they’re not great classroom trainers. While most possess adequate subject-matter expertise in their given Epic application, their ability to engage learners and facilitate knowledge transfer in the classroom often falls short of what is needed to adequately prepare end users to make a seamless transition to the new system at Go Live.

Most Epic training departments within healthcare organizations spend too little if any time preparing trainers with the soft-skills needed to ensure success in the classroom, concentrating their energies instead on dealing with build issues, rewriting lesson plans and making sure their trainers know the curriculum. All important tasks to be sure, but the unintended consequence is a group of trainers often ill equipped to manage classroom dynamics, facilitate adult learning, or skillfully handle overwhelmed, confused and resistant end users.

The good news is that most of what trainers need to learn can be integrated into a train-the-trainer process that seamlessly complements their Epic training. We start by giving trainers well-written Epic lesson plans and making sure they understand their organization’s unique build and workflows, but we ultimately set them up for success by equipping them with 14 key soft-skill training competencies that differentiate average trainers from great trainers. Specifically, trainers need to know how to:

  1. build rapport, trust and credibility with end users.
  2. hook, engage and motivate learners during classroom sessions.
  3. deliver with impact and make effective use of nonverbal communication—tone, volume, body language, eye contact, gestures, volume, pacing—to keep learners tuned-in and engaged.
  4. optimize learner readiness by helping end users not only understand course objectives, but appreciate how they’ll personally benefit from the new system.
  5. read their audience and teach to all learning styles—auditory, visual, kinesthetic, interpersonal, intrapersonal—to help end users comprehend, retrain and apply what is taught.
  6. use directional statements effectively to ensure all learners are rowing in the same direction and keeping pace with the instructor.
  7. develop strong in-classroom partnerships with Super Users, who play a vital role in helping latecomers get caught up and helping slower learners get back on track.
  8. use music, icebreakers and energizers appropriately to lighten the mood and create a positive classroom training environment.
  9. ask effective questions to check for understanding and involve learners.
  10. make sure the end user “got it.”
  11. handle questions from learners and use the “parking lot” effectively
  12. help participants navigate through, align with and support the change to Epic.
  13. give end users strategies for simultaneously managing patient care and the PC.
  14. handle difficult, frustrated and confused end users and manage resistance in the classroom to neutralize disruptions and enhance everyone’s learning experience.

The time spent preparing trainers how to train, and not just memorizing lesson plans and studying workflows, pays handsome dividends. Not only are end users better prepared, leading to smoother Go Live events with fewer speed bumps, but ultimately the patient experience is positively impacted, as clinicians and other Epic end users spend less time fumbling through the system and more time paying attention to patient care and safety.

Written by Danny Lewis, Senior Learning and Development Professional

 

Staffing: An Important Component to Successful EHR Training

As one who has been in the role of an EHR training manager for several clients, I’ve learned that one of the key challenges to a successful training initiative is how well you staff your training team.  Trying to save on staffing your training team will negatively impact your EHR implementation and likely result in higher go-live support and ongoing training costs.

I’ve learned that three critical elements in staffing your training team are:

  • Compensate well: The EHR market is very competitive. Once you “credential” your trainers, they can become hot commodities in a tight market. You don’t want to have to recruit once training begins and as you get close to go-live.
  • Build diverse / cross-over skill sets: By doing so, you invest in your trainers and build loyalty, while ensuring that you have back ups and coverage across all modules. Don’t put your eggs in one basket as they say.
  • Invest in the soft skills training (e.g., “train-the-trainer” type programs for your soon-to-be trainers): Learning how to transfer knowledge to adults in a health care IT setting is truly an art.  Even if you hire seasoned trainers, it’s good to get your team on the same page and to refresh their adult training skills.

Your trainers are also the face of your EHR project and change management facilitators. We don’t just want to teach your learners EHR functionality; we need to sell it to them. Therefore, it’s critical that they understand and convey to their learners:

  • Why are we going up on this new EHR?
  • Will this new system really improve how we provide patient care?
  • WIFFM: “What’s-in-it-for-me?”  How will this new system and the training make my life better?
  • Where do I go for help after training?
  • It’s OK to fail and to play in the system.  Learners won’t become experts upon leaving the classroom, but they should have a solid understanding and a road map for adoption.

Lastly, if you are like most EHR go-live sites, you’ll need a larger, temporary team of trainers to prepare for go-live.  Trying to cut costs by training non-EHR trainers to become EHR experts is a risky proposition.  I recommend a blended approach of seasoned and non-seasoned EHR training talent.

Don’t got it alone: Partner with and rely upon an experienced consulting /  recruiting firm to assist with the recruiting / evaluating, interview, and onboarding process. Many recruiters and consulting firms are happy to place warm bodies; few truly understand EHR training and how to place solid, experienced trainers who are a good fit for your organization and who will play a huge role in making or breaking your implementation.

–Tony Onorad, EHR Training Management Consultant